Anet Laos coriander/ dill

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Anet Laos coriander/ dill/Thì là

Product code VEG131
Category FRESH HERB
 

Description/Taste
Baby dill is the young, tender stalks and leaves of the mature dill plant. The stalks are slender and topped with feathery, alternating, branched leaves divided into thin, thread-like segments. Baby Dill is harvested between 15 and 20 centimeters tall, well before the plant matures and begins to flower. Baby Dill offers a mild, sweet anise flavor with hints of parsley and celery. Older plants will develop thicker, hollow stems and can grow anywhere from 1 to 1.5 meters tall.

Seasons/Availability
Baby dill is available year-round with a peak season during the winter months.

Current Facts
Baby Dill is an aromatic herb, botanically classified as Anethum graveolens. The herb is a member of the Umbelliferae family, also known as the celery, carrot or parsley family, and is cultivated for its delicate fresh leaves. Baby Dill is harvested at the very early stages of growth, when the plant is still small and tender, and the flavor is milder. Though the herb is most often associated with pickling, Baby Dill is also popular in Scandinavian, Eastern European, Indian and Mediterranean cuisines.

Nutritional Value
Baby Dill is a great source of vitamins A and C and a good source of manganese, iron and folate. The herb also contains calcium, riboflavin, niacin and potassium and trace amounts of vitamin B6, dietary fiber, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc and copper. Its medicinal properties are due to the presence of monoterpene compounds, flavonoids, volatile oils and amino acids. Dill has also demonstrated anti-bacterial properties.

Applications
Baby Dill is most often used fresh, but it is also used in its dried, or dehydrated, form. It may be used in fresh or cooked preparations, or as a garnish. It is often paired with fish, especially salmon, and in cream or wine-based sauces. Pair Baby Dill with yogurt, soft cheeses or cream, cucumbers, lentils, tomatoes, dried fruit, seafood, poultry, and beans. Use it as a salad herb or in pasta dishes with smoked fish or caviar, or in barley, quinoa, couscous or bulgur wheat dishes. In Greek, Turkish and Slavic cuisine the herb is paired with chicken, spinach, mushrooms and lamb. In Germany it is paired with eggs, cheese and potatoes. Keep Baby Dill dry until ready to use. If it becomes wilted, you can put the stems in a glass of water and cover with a plastic bag. Baby Dill will keep refrigerated for up to a week and it can be frozen and kept for up to 2 months.

Source: specialtyproduce.com